Goodbye Paris

What would you do in the City of Light?

The Caves & Catacombs of Paris: Adventure Itinerary

Thank you so much for your votes for Adventure #3! My next adventure in Paris will be:

Paris CatacombsCaving in Paris. Explore the huge system of caverns, caves, and catacombs below Paris, left from when the Romans quarried the region for stone. Every once in a while a bit of Paris plunges into a hole (more information from National Geographic).

 

Such a cool adventure. I’m excited to share the results with you.

The Caves and Catacombs of Paris: My Itinerary Thus Far

I’ve researched and planned my itinerary to explore the caves and catacombs of Paris, and here’s the schedule:

Tuesday at 9:00 A.M.: Tour les Catacombes Histoire de Paris, where over six million Parisians were buried after cemeteries aboveground grew overcrowded (apparently there were bodies piled 15 feet high). You can see the skulls stacked in the Picture above.

Tuesday at 11 A.M.: Tour through Publique des Égouts de Paris, the sewer museum of Paris. Victor Hugo called the sewer system in Paris the “conscience of the city,” and supposedly had a friend who was an expert in the sewer system of Paris helped with the sewer scenes in Les Miserables. Apparently, this tour is quite smelly.

Wednesday at 2 P.M.: Tour Cluny Medieval Museum, where the Romans built subterranean hot baths in the first century.

Wednesday at 9:30 P.M.: I’m taking Talia to an exquisite dinner at Spring Restaurant, which has a dining room 72 feet underground, in a subterranean cave that was part of a network of chalk and limestone quarries dug by the Romans.

Wednesday at 11:30 P.M.: Dancing at Caveau de Huchette, a secret underground hideout of Templars and French Revolutionaries (apparently executions were committed here, in between clandestine meetings), that was converted into a jazz club in 1946!

TBA: Tour and wine tasting at Les Crayeures des Montquartiers, a former chalk quarry which served as a bomb shelter in WWII and, earlier, to farm mushrooms and brew beer.

I Could Use Your Help

One thing I would like to do, but haven’t been able to schedule, is tour the restricted caves underneath Paris. Most of Paris, was quarried extensively by earlier inhabitants of the city, and there are hundreds of miles of tunnels beneath the city. Unfortunately, the French police has restricted access to these caves, sealing all entrances inside the city.

However, cataphiles, people who still explore the caves today, are sometimes willing to guide interested people into the caves of Paris. The trick is finding them.

So here’s my challenge for you: If you can use all your research skills to connect me with a cataphile in Paris, I’ll give you five free copies of the book, and a small souvenir from Paris. I’ll also mention your name in the book. You can email me here if you find someone. Happy hunting!

Any other catacomb and cave suggestions?

  • Mr. Joe, I just got a contact from a cataphile. Does the email: work? For some reason I wasn’t able to send a message through the joebunting.com contact form.

  • La McCoy

    I am not a catacomb person. We were given a special dinner in one once.
    Creepy.

    • Ew. Really? What did you eat?

      • La McCoy

        I was told we were served octopus. I did not eat it. Don’t remember what I ate.

  • Huge thanks to Arlen Miller who was able to get me in touch with David Babinet, a filmmaker and cataphile who was featured on NPR. David has agreed to help me get into the caves. I’ll let you know more details as I get them.

    • That’s wonderful! Looking forward to hear how it goes. All the best, Mr. Joe.